MIT Technology Review

MIT Technology Review
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MIT Technology Review

 •  April 25

Desktop Metal thinks its machines will give designers and manufacturers a practical and affordable way to print metal parts. It’s less than two months before his company’s initial product launch, and CEO Ric Fulop is excitedly showing off rows of stripped-down 3-D printers, several bulky microwave furnaces, and assorted small metal objects on a...

MIT Technology Review

 •  September 17, 2015

Within hours of the find’s announcement, researchers around the world started making replicas of the bones using 3-D printing. When it comes to understanding ... information from radiocarbon dating – a technique that relies on the steady rate of ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  June 18, 2013

There can be little doubt that plastic materials have dramatically improved everything from clothing to travel to communications to building. Some of the damage they have caused, however, is equally dramatic.
The most well-documented concerns about traditional plastics relate to their persistence in the environment. Plastic bags and water bottles ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  April 29, 2013

In material science, toughness is a measure of the amount of energy a material can absorb before breaking. Kevlar, for example, can absorb some 80 Joules per gram before breaking but this is dwarfed by certain natural materials which are much tougher. The silk produced by the giant riverine orb spider, for instance, can absorb around 390 Joules ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  January 4, 2013

Product space: Harvard economist Ricardo Hausmann advises governments on what to manufacture.
The U.S. has lost millions of manufacturing jobs since 2000. Industries have moved offshore. America’s trade deficit in physical goods is $738 billion a year.
So what’s the path forward?
Countries trying to understand what’s next for their export ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  November 16, 2012

Conducting polymers are plastics that carry current. This is an emerging technology that is beginning to have a significant impact on areas ranging from photovoltaics and printed circuit boards to batteries and biological sensors.
The advantages of plastic conductors are many. They are cheap, flexible and light. They are also simple to make and to ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  August 21, 2012

MC10, a startup in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is getting ready to commercialize high-performance electronics that can stretch. The technology could lead to such products as skin patches that monitor whether the wearer is sufficiently hydrated, or inflatable balloon catheters equipped with sensors that measure electrical misfiring caused by cardiac ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  July 31, 2012

Best known as a consumer electronics company, Panasonic is investing in research for using solar energy to produce industrial chemicals from CO2.
The company yesterday provided some details on its “artificial photosynthesis” research it says can form the basis for large-scale conversion of CO2 into useful products using sunlight as an energy ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  May 10, 2012

A U.K. company says its highly pressure-sensitive material could be used to integrate an “electronic nose” into paper or clothing.
Peratech’s sensor rapidly detects volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—gases in our surrounding environment that are produced by a wide variety of sources, everything from household paints to a person’s own skin. Many do ...

MIT Technology Review

 •  August 26, 2011

Stretchable light: This polymer LED can stretch up to 45 percent along one axis while emitting a sky-blue light.
Stretchable electronics promise video displays that could be rolled up and tucked into a shirt pocket, or cell phones that could swell or shrink. Electronic sheets that could be draped like cloth would be a boon for robotic skin and ...