The Washington Post

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The Washington Post

 •  September 27

Please switch to portrait mode for the best viewing experience Meet three innovators who are changing the world with plastic Historically, human prosthetics were crude devices. They were often made from wood, steel and leather, and movement was frequently difficult for patients. However, war veterans returning from WWII pushed for improved...

The Washington Post

 •  September 18

Q: I recently removed a medallion from my dining room ceiling to complete repairs. The medallion, which is not original to the house, is made of a soft, flexible material. The outer edges are scalloped and have scallops along each scallop. I am now faced with reattaching it to the ceiling. Any suggestions on the type of glue to use and how to keep...

The Washington Post

 •  June 13

Even in 2017, we often decide whether the salmon in the back of our refrigerator is still edible by giving it a sniff and looking at the “sell by” date. A company called Braskem wants to bring a little more science into the decision. It has developed a way to make plastic food or beverage containers change color when they react to the changing pH...

The Washington Post

 •  March 23

Down the road from the Detroit headquarters of America’s largest automotive manufacturers sit the offices of what many might consider an unlikely but essential ally in the challenge to save energy—a petrochemical manufacturer that uses liquids derived from oil and natural gas to create high-tech plastics as strong as metal but light enough to save...

The Washington Post

 •  February 9

Tuesday night, in an act of movie-promotion-slash-celebrity-torture, comedian and actor Will Arnett walked barefoot across a pile of Lego bricks. The pit was styled in the fashion of firewalkers’ embers, to highlight these toys’ sole purpose: pain. Arnett, who voices Batman in the upcoming “The Lego Batman Movie,” hustled through the pit on “Jimmy...

The Washington Post

 •  April 6, 2016

(iStock) A chemical used to make plastic IV tubes and catheters has been linked to attention deficit disorder in children who received treatment for a serious illness, according to a new study. The tubing and catheters contain plastic-softening chemicals, called phthalates, which have been banned from children's toys and products such as teething...

The Washington Post

 •  July 1, 2013

In the division of labor that has long governed North American auto manufacturing, the Big Three and other companies typically have built their top moneymakers in the United States, using their Mexican plants to produce smaller, cheaper cars with lower profit margins.
But that division is breaking down. As Mexico cranks out record numbers of ...

The Washington Post

 •  June 10, 2013

On Monday evening, the Senate voted 66 to 27 to approve a massive farm bill that will set the course of U.S. food policy for the next half-decade. The old farm bill expired last year, and its replacement is 1,150 pages long, costing some $955 billion over 10 years. So what’s actually in it?
The Congressional Research Service has one of the few ...

The Washington Post

 •  May 1, 2013

It’s hardly news when a U.S. firm moves its manufacturing operations abroad to China. But what about when a Chinese company sets up a factory in the United States?
That actually happened in January, when Lenovo, a Beijing-based computer maker, opened a new manufacturing line in Whitsett, N.C., to handle assembly of PCs, tablets, workstations and ...

The Washington Post

 •  April 7, 2013

We live in a post-industrial age, defined more by Google than by General Motors. The term “post-industrial society” was first popularized by the sociologist Daniel Bell (1919-2011) in a 1973 book, and the change has generally been a boon. The transition from factory to office has raised living standards, curbed pollution and reduced the number of ...