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Treehugger

 •  October 30

The best way to have our buildings use less energy is to insulate them really well. But for a long time, I have also been writing about the problems of insulating with plastic foam, even writing that Polystyrene insulation doesn't belong in green building. There were a number of reasons, including the fact that they are full of dangerous fire...

Treehugger

 •  March 27

Recycling is confusing, even for the most well-intentioned and informed conscious consumers. Capabilities of municipal recycling facilities vary from region to region, and items that are difficult-to-recycle sometimes get looped in with regularly accepted items. Not all paper, metal, glass and plastic packaging is created equal, and many common...

Treehugger

 •  November 17, 2016

© Stitchology/Facebook -- Reusable cotton bags for plastic-free shopping Plastic-free living requires careful and conscientious consumer choices. Here are more ideas to help you along the journey. 1. Burn beeswax or other natural candles to scent your home, instead of air fresheners. Just make sure to avoid palm oil in the ingredient list. 2....

Treehugger

 •  November 15, 2013

Though we've seen bioplastics in consumer products and packaging, a new pavilion designed and built by German students and professors from Stuttgart University's ITKE (Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design) demonstrates the structural possibilities of an innovative bioplastic created specifically for use in construction.
Dubbed ...

Treehugger

 •  June 17, 2013

By: Zhao Qin & Markus J. Buehler; Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Nature provides a rich diversity of biological materials such as bone, diatom algae and spider silk. These materials have fascinating mechanical and biological functions ...

Treehugger

 •  September 24, 2012

Instead of throwing out (or with any luck, composting) the thousands of tons of old coffee grounds and stale bakery goods generated by coffeehouses every day of the week, what if those same substances became the raw feedstock for producing renewable biofuels or plastics? That's what a research project is setting out to explore, thanks to a ...